HPV vaccine side effects: symptoms and ways of prevention

Human papillomavirus (HPV ) is a kind of viral infection that is majorly spread through skin contact. There are over 100 types of this virus. HPV vaccine side effects This virus is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and gets spread from skin-to-skin contact. There are many strains of this virus and can cause warts on your feet, hands, face, etc. There are about 30 HPV strains that affect the genitals including the vagina, vulva, cervix, penis, scrotums, rectum, and anus. 

A few strains of this virus are “high-risk” types, as some kinds can result in cancer. But early detection can prevent this from happening. This infection is anyhow very common and usually occurs through sexual activities. 

How can you get an HPV infection?

Well, this infection is generally spread by contact, i.e., when a person with this virus physically touches you via sexual activity. If you are very sexually active, then chances are that you can get an HPV infection. You can get this infection by having anal, vaginal, or oral sex with a person who has this virus. The worst thing is that a person can spread this virus to you even if they do not show any physical signs and symptoms. After getting this infection, it takes a long time to develop the signs. HPV can be transmitted to your child in case you are pregnant, but the chances for this situation to happen are quite low. 

Symptoms of HPV 

Although, HPV infections don’t show any symptoms or health problems. According to a study, 90% of HPV infections go away on their own within the time of 2 years. HPV vaccine side effects But during this time, the person could be transmitting the virus to another person. 

In cases when the infection doesn’t end, warts are developed. Warts include genital warts and throat warts. HPV can also show adverse effects such as cervical cancers and cancer of the head, neck, throat, and genitals. Although, the kind of PV virus that is cancer-causing doesn’t show any physical signs in a person’s body, which is scary. Regular screening can help in the early detection of the virus and increases the chances of survival.  

HPV in men   

Men who have an HPV infection generally show no signs of infection. Some men develop genital warts. So, if you notice unusual bumps and lesions on your penis, scrotum, or anus, contact a doctor. Some strains of this HPV vaccine side effects show a high risk of developing penile, anal, and throat cancer in men. Some men have a high risk of developing HPV-related cancers. Sich men usually have a weak immunity system or receive anal sex.  

HPV in women   

Just like men, women who catch this infection also fail to show any signs of the virus and the infection goes away on its own. According to a study, 80% of women get in contact with at least one type of this virus in their lifetime. In cases where the virus doesn’t go on its own, then women might see genital warts inside the vagina, on the cervix, the vulva, and in or around the anus. HPV vaccine side effects If you notice any bumps in around the genital area, then contact a doctor. Some strains of this HPV virus show a high risk of developing cervical cancer in women. Conducting DNA tests on the cervical cells can detect strains of cancer-associated HPV strain. 

Prevent infections with the HPV vaccine 

HPV vaccination should be done for 11-12-year-olds. All pre-teens should get the vaccination to prevent HPV infections in later parts of their life. CDC says that 11- to 12-year-olds receive two doses of HPV vaccine with a gap of 6 to 12 months. Teens and young adults ages 15 through 26 years need three doses of the HPV vaccine. Although, vaccination is not recommended for anyone with age more than 26 years old and:

  • Adults in age groups 27 to 45 years old who are not vaccinated 
  • If you have an allergy to any ingredient of the HPV vaccine 
  • If you are allergic to yeast
  • If you are pregnant 

Just like every other vaccine, the HPV vaccine also shows some common side effects which are mild. These mild symptoms are: 

  • Nausea
  • Pain, redness, or swelling in the arm where the shot was given
  • Dizziness or fainting (fainting after any vaccine, including the HPV vaccine 
  • Headache 
  • Tiredness
  • Muscle or joint pain

The MMR vaccine side effects are also similar to the above-listed effects. These effects go away in a day or two on their own. 

Final Note: 

Human papillomavirus (HPV ) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that spreads from skin-to-skin contact. HPV vaccine side effects There are many strains of this virus that can cause warts on your feet, hands, face, etc. This virus affects the genitals including the vagina, vulva, cervix, penis, scrotums, rectum, and anus. A few strains of this virus are risky and can result in cancer. But early detection can prevent this from happening. An HPV vaccine can prevent you from catching this virus and stay safe from the risk of getting this virus.

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