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New Zealand Saves Series Parity In The 4th ODI
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New Zealand Saves Series Parity In The 4th ODI 

‍The fourth ODI of the series pitted New Zealand against England at Wellington. As the match wore on, it seemed as if the side with the best bowling attack had more success than their counterparts. New Zealand crumbled under pressure registering their second-lowest score in the shortest duration to concede a fifty-over game (202/6). 

Nevertheless, parity remained and it was set up by two brilliant knocks from Ross Taylor and Kane Williamson. In fact, Taylor’s knock was so good that it led to a coin toss for which bat would be used in the next over! Prior to this over, batting coach and former New Zealand captain Stephen Fleming suggested that Rilee Wickelton should use his right hand instead of using a ‘natural’ left hand. 

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It worked and on came Steve Smith – who smashed six boundaries in his 22 balls. Finally, Dane Vilas bowled a full toss that beat Smith’s outside edge but he registered an inside edge to send Duminy back on strike. The umpire ruled Stripe Ball, meaning that they would have another go with neither bat nor ball being used again in this match (or any other).

However, at 114/5 after 20 overs, New Zealand were still 140 runs short of victory. When Henry Nicholls found form late on and completed his half-century off just 32 balls, Williamson sensed blood and he swatted a missile into orbit off Wickelton’s final over to complete an O

 

The best new feature to come out of the ODI format is T20 cricket

The thought of ‘one-day cricket’ was limited to a format of 15 overs per side. But then came the IPL, followed by the Big Bash League, and then the inaugural season of the T20 World Cup. Now, anyone can see that the essence of the one-day game can be extended to 20 overs by decreasing the number of overs to 20. This provides a more purposeful kind of cricket where every single ball matters. 

The IPL has given birth to a new kind of cricketing culture. Be it the Chennai Super Kings or the Mumbai Indians, viewers experience a different form of the game than they are used to watching. Now, the same happens in the ODI format. The T20 World Cup has created a new sub-genre of cricket: the T20-slams, where two teams chase a target of 200 or 300. The format is exciting and provides an equal chance to every team to win a game. What’s more, the knockouts in this tournament also mean that it is a shorter format of the game with a lot of drama and excitement.

 

New Zealand Saves Series Parity In The 5th ODI

New Zealand were in a spot of bother in the fifth one-dayer against England. The hosts were looking to level the series at 1-1 and facing a stiff challenge from a spirited and confident England side. In the end, Hamilton Masakadza led his side home with a seven-wicket haul to give his team the much-needed victory. 

The Black Caps had been cruising along in the middle overs and looked as if they would win comfortably until they lost their way in the final 15 overs. Masakadza, who had been a part of the Zimbabwe team that went down in a 3-1 defeat to England in the 2011 World Cup, gave them the momentum they needed in the final matches of the series. He took 7/39 in the final 15 overs as New Zealand staved off a late match-winning effort by England.

 

Dwayne Bravo’s masterful spell in the 5th ODI

Dwayne Bravo was a key factor in New Zealand’s win in the fifth one-dayer against England in Hamilton. With the score at 182/5 in the 18th over, Bravo, with the help of a regulation catch from Ross Taylor, took the equation to the next level with a spell of 5/10 in the final over. Bravo had already taken two wickets in the over, but he returned to take 5/10 in the final over that he bowled with the last two balls of the 18th over. 

New Zealand looked in trouble at 182/5 when Bravo was introduced into the attack. However, Bravo came in with the intention of taking the equation to the next level and he did precisely that. With Taylor caught at short fine leg and Henry Nicholls caught at long on, New Zealand were left with just one run to get off the last ball. However, Bravo bowled it full and straight at the batsman, who was almost forced to play it straight to the fielder at long off.

 

Ross Taylor’s game changing innings in the 6th ODI

New Zealand captain Ross Taylor was a force to be reckoned with in the sixth one-dayer against England in Hamilton. In the first innings, Taylor had smashed an unbeaten 102 (194 balls, 8×6, 2×4) as New Zealand posted a challenging 241/7 in their 50 overs. In reply, England were all out for just 183. An effective start from Taylor left England all out in 36.5 overs giving New Zealand a win by 42 runs. Taylor’s unbeaten 103 was an innings that proved to be the match-winner in the match. 

In the process, he became only the fourth player to score a century in their first six one-dayers in New Zealand. This feat had been accomplished by only four players till date. Taylor’s unbeaten 103 was an innings that proved to be the match-winner in the match. In the process, he became only the fourth player to score a century in their first six one-dayers in New Zealand. This feat had been accomplished by only four players till date.

 

Kane Williamson’s heave in the 6th ODI

New Zealand skipper Kane Williamson was in a similar kind of form in the sixth one-dayer against England in Hamilton. In the first innings, Williamson had smashed an unbeaten 92 (199 balls, 9×4, 1×6) as the Black Caps posted a challenging 249/6 in their 50 overs. In reply, England were all out for just 183. An effective start from Williamson left England all out in 36.5 overs giving New Zealand a win by 42 runs. Williamson’s heave at Lord’s was a shot that will be remembered for a long time. 

Williamson had already moved to 97 when he heaved at the last ball. This was a shot that would have been played by a Test batsman, but for New Zealand’s innings and Williamson’s 97, it would have been a shot that a normal batsman would have played. His heave at the last ball is one of the best heaves that you would see in a one-dayer.

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